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Dog’s Tongue.

A dog’s tongue is quite remarkable. It is used to keep them cool, to licks wounds, to lap up water, and along with the rest of their mouth is a key element of how a dog interacts with objects. With all these important responsibilities, fortunately tongue problems are fairly rare. Injury is the most common problem. Often these injuries initially look terrible as if the dog is active the tongue is helping the dog stay cool, and therefore the blood vessels in the tongue are full and dilated. A cut will bleed profusely when a dog is warm but once the dog cools down many injuries simply clot and heal themselves, yet it is still wise to contact a vet any time a dog bleeds significantly. Temperature regulation is a critical tongue function for a dog. Since they don’t sweat, dogs cool themselves predominantly through their tongue, though their paws release heat too. If you watch your dog play and exercise you can see how his tongue often flops out of his mouth as he runs which provides air and cooling. Panting is the more controlled cooling mechanism of the tongue. This is part of the reason providing a dog with access to fresh water is so important. Lapping up water is a direct way for a dog to cool himself off.

The tongue is an important part of a dog’s mouth, which acts almost like hands do for people. Dog’s have a natural instinct to pick up, chew, and investigate objects with their mouth. The tongue helps them feel the texture of an object and helps them identify objects by both taste and texture. Finally, the most obvious use of the tongue is to help the dog eat and drink. As most dog owners can attest to, dogs will seek out food, treats and other items they like through smell and taste, and is the tool which helps them in the mechanics of eating and drinking. Other than the heart and brain, the tongue is one the most vital organs for a dog.

 

 

 

 


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